Tag: Music

Love is a losing game

Before Amy Winehouse shot to international fame with her award-winning album, Back to Black, she was already mesmerizing a limited number of followers with her gift. I have to admit that while I had always known that with the way she carried on with her drug and alcohol binges, it was just a matter of time before her body gave out to the effects of addiction. Last Saturday, she joined the 27 Club.
A favorite from her first album, Love is a Losing Game tells of how love is a lot like gambling; only the player is often dealt with the losing hand. It’s a painfully sad yet hauntingly true assessment of the greatest of human emotions.

Love Is A Losing Game
For you I was a flame
Love is a losing game
Five story fire as you came
Love is a losing game
One I wish I never played
Oh what a mess we made
And now the final frame
Love is a losing game
Played out by the band
Love is a losing hand
More than I could stand
Love is a losing hand
Self professed… profound
Till the chips were down
Know you’re a gambling man
Love is a losing hand
Though I battle blind
Love is a fatal resign
Memories mar my mind
Love is a fatal resign
Over futile odds
And laughed at by the gods
And now the final frame
Love is a losing game

Charice’s appearance on ‘Glee’

I have a hunch that the country stopped the way it has always done whenever Manny Pacquiao’s got a fight on.  Here be the initial video grabs of Charice Pempenco’s guesting as Filipina exchange student, Sunshine Corazon, on the hit TV musical, Glee.

Sadly, Sunshine Corazon is joining New Direction’s rival Vocal Adrenaline.

This, too, might one day be forgotten

I don’t remember anymore who taught me to sing Pinoy folk songs, such as Bahay Kubo, Leron Leron Sinta, and Paro-Parong Bukid; it must have been my Lola, my mother, or my kindergarten teacher. However, I learned to appreciate such songs about the simple life on the countryside: there was a the typical nipa hut in the middle of a vegetable garden, a young man named Leron unsuccessfully picking papaya fruits from a wobbly tree, and a barrio lass metaphorically referred to as a butterfly (paru-paro).

I wonder what kids nowadays sing at classrooms apart from the usual ABC and Twinkle Twinkle little stars, especially at private pre-elementary schools. Do parents and teachers, especially those who insist that their kids speak only English, still teach their kids to sing folk songs? Or do we only find it cool when foreign choirs sing our Bahay-Kubo, and whatnot?