Source: The Guardian

Even the King, who has every reason to fear her, has complete faith in her decent nature once she’s promised to him that she won’t interfere with his life. This is what launches Doyle’s story well ahead of its time. Much is made of Adler outwitting Holmes, and that’s fair enough. What’s more impressive is Doyle showing that unconventional habits, self-determination, and a history of impressive romantic conquests — Doyle makes a point of mentioning that Irene Adler enchants just about every man in sight — are just that. They do not imply low character, criminal tendencies, or inferior intellect. They aren’t the tools of a gold digger or an opportunistic seductress who’s waiting to unleash her apparently lethal sexuality on the hero. A clever, unconventional, take-charge, and seductive woman is, unreservedly, a good thing.


Why can’t recent Sherlock Holmes adaptation get Irene Adler right?