“I’m suspicious of all the mother-hen types: they want to nurture their teams, but tend to smother them. And I’m suspicious of the overly-organized types: they want to bring process to chaos, but process stifles invention, and it can be used to disguise incompetence for an entire career. I’m suspicious of empire builders; too often they lower their hiring bar. I’ve heard or seen a hundred reasons for becoming a manager, and I now view all of them with suspicion, because each reason is a potential psychological problem waiting to manifest itself on a soon-to-be-unhappy engineering team.

“I know some of good managers, even great ones, and none of them are managing. They’re leading, and there’s a world of difference. You’ve heard a hundred clichéd descriptions of leadership, but you probably also know at least one or two people you consider great leaders, so you know intuitively how it can work via their examples. And if you know enough great leaders, you know there are vastly different styles at work.

“I won’t try to characterize those styles here; it would take us too far afield. But I think the best managers don’t want to manage: they want to lead. In fact most leaders probably don’t think about it much, at least at first, because they’re too busy leading: rushing headlong towards a goal and leading everyone around them in that direction, whether they’re on the team or not. Leadership stems from having a clear vision, strong convictions, and enough drive and talent to get your ideas and goals across to a diverse group of people who can help you achieve them. If you have all that, you’re close. Then you just need empathy so you don’t work everyone to death. If you’re a great leader, you can put the whip away; everyone will give you everything they’ve got.

“Put in that light, management no longer seems so glamorous, does it? Ironically, “I want to be a manager” is just about the worst sentiment a would-be manager could possibly express, because the statement has absolutely nothing to do with leadership. A leader doesn’t fixate on management, which is after all just a bureaucratic framework that attempts to simulate leadership through process and protocol. Great teams building great things don’t worry about process. They just build whatever it is as fast as they can.”

–From a comment on Leading from the trenches.

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