Have the courage to fail big and stick around

Elizabethtown is one of those films that showed promise but didn’t do well amongst mass audiences. Maybe one has to go through some real issues in one’s life to really appreciate the message behind the film. For others, may be it is enough to be a fan of Orland Bloom, who is reprising his role as Legolas in the next installment of The Hobbit.

Following the arch of its more successful predecessors, Jerry Maguire and Almost Famous, this is the story of Drew Baylor (Orlando Bloom) who gets sacked for costing his company nearly a billion dollars on a terrible shoe design. To make matters worse, his father dies while on a visit to Georgia, and he has to make funeral arrangements that conflict with what his extended family prefers. On the flight to the south, he meets bubbly attendant, Claire (Kirsten Dunst), who has relationship issues of her own, but remains on the brighter side of things. She falls for him, he is too focused on his troubles to care.

What follows captures the idea of a supportive partner, the courage to break the rules, and the are we/are we not a couple conundrum.

Back in the day, Orlando Bloom was one of the hottest commodities in Hollywood, following his portrayal of Legolas, possibly the most gorgeous elf that strutted in Middle Earth and slayed hundreds of orcs with a flick of his bow and arrow. His fame was then confirmed with the popularity of Pirates of the Caribbean, although he was outshined by Johnny Depp and even Keira Knightly, both of whom were eventually nominated for Oscars in succeeding roles.

Relatable.

Elizabethtown didn’t do well in the box office, but if you can see past the less than stellar chemistry between the two leads; or Paula Deen’s appearance as Drew’s aunt; or holes in the plot line, you just might end up feeling good about this film, which after all is about love, courage, and redemption.

Side note: In the real world, how a shoe model that has no way of getting sold goes to mass market is unthinkable; more so is the idea of blaming everything on the shoe designer and not on someone higher up the pecking order.