Why You Need to Train Your People

When just about all jobs and job categories have become temporary and contractual, it matters to learn new skills and keep improving.

The best people out there are lifelong learners who have both the humility to acknowledge that they don’t know nor can do everything and the confidence that they can always acquire new knowledge and skills.

How to Use Business Intelligence Intelligently

Research firm Gartner Inc. has predicted that in two years, more than thirty-five percent of the world’s top 5000 companies will make significant decision errors about business and market growth. On the flip-side of the coin, internal decision-making will encounter roadblocks as the results of incorrect or incomplete information because employees often get bogged down when it comes to reporting the minutiae of their day-to-day work. In fact, it is not surprising to find that among the largest global corporations, there are some people that stick to age-old data gathering, reporting and analysis by spreadsheets. The challenge is in how to wean organizations from the old ways of dealing with business intelligence.

When business intelligence is not smart enough to survive in today’s environment, it is time to rethink Business Intelligence strategies – here are some tips.

Capability Model of the People for the People by the People

Many organizations’ practices have matured over time particularly in the area of software engineering. However, practitioners observed that workers must appreciate their roles and responsibilities in the larger organization. This is where P-CMM comes in. Human resources and workforce managers used to hire workers on the strength of technical knowledge alone; but in order to harness the technical knowledge of workers into tangible products (for example: a piece of software), managers have realized that staff development within the company must be compatible with internal process improvements.

In a nutshell, it means helping workers help top managers steer project processes according to current and target capability levels and project directions, as well as providing a framework for optimizing employee competencies for greater measurable value. For human resources and worker development practitioners, P-CMM serves as a framework for developing employees from mere knowledge workers to knowledge managers.

To do so, it is important to always revisit P-CMM’s five-level capability architecture. Most organizations with little to no established internal processes, aside perhaps from those related to administrative matters, manage employee development in mostly ad-hoc fashion where workers are designated to positions and projects without much consideration for the impact on the long-term vision of the company.

Read the rest on ExecutiveBrief: Why is People Capability Maturity Model Necessary?

The 7 Essentials of Highly Successful Project Initiations

Seasoned project managers know that successful projects most often start with successful beginnings. In fact, before actual project implementation, the mix of the project, people, tools, and approaches could either spell success… or disaster. Thus, it is important to set and manage the expectations of all project stakeholders because how they will perform their roles and responsibilities, or achieve desired outcomes and other motivational factors depend on what they know about the venture.

Project Initiation is that critical stage of the project where information about the nature of the project, why the project exists, who is involved, and how the project will be delivered must be laid down. Meri Williams, author of “The Principles of Project Management” (2008) cites seven best practices for a successful project initiation. Let us pick up and expand upon her seven best practices:

On ExecutiveBrief: The 7 Essentials of Highly Successful Project Initiations
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It’s the People, Stupid

In their book Change Management: The People Side of Change, Jeff Hiatt and Timothy J. Creasy reported the top five obstacles to implementing change were employee and staff resistance, middle-management resistance, poor executive sponsorship, limited resources, and corporate politics.

Four out of these five obstacles are about people, while only one refers to resources. Yet if people were not a problem, limited resources should not be a major “show-stopper” either, for any change project, and it should not be difficult at all to pool time, talent, and knowledge.

Given that people are usually the most common change obstacles, there are some approaches to manage the human factor of change management – based on the authors’ suggestions.